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Age Related Vision Issues May Start Earlier Than You Think…

Do you tilt your newspaper or book towards the window when trying to read the small print?  Are your glasses coming off when you attempt to decipher the numbers on your credit card?

You may be one of millions who are experiencing what it means to have aging eyes, and people are feeling these effects as early as their 40’s.   It’s recommended that you have regular vision checks and maintain a healthy lifestyle to stay on top of any problems needing medical treatment.

For many, dealing with the struggles of aging eye can be as simple as making small changes to have a big impact on your quality of life.

Need for more light. As you age, you need more light to see as well as you used to. Brighter lights in your work area or next to your reading chair will help make reading and other close-up tasks easier.

You’ll want to have the best light you can.  This means light optimized for  less glare and more clarity to ease the strain on your eyes.

As we age, the lens of our eyes starts to lose the transparency and become clouded, so you will want to look for lighting that will compensate for these changes in your eyes,and enhance those spectral colors that we tend to have more difficulty seeing as we age.

Choosing proper lighting is one of the easiest and best changes you can make as you live with the aging process and how it affects your vision.  Quality lighting is essential to ease your eye strain and tension headaches, while enabling you to do what you love for longer.

Source: Adult Vision: 41 to 60 Years of Age

If you are in the market for better light or have questions about how to best meet your lighting needs, please drop us a note and we’ll be happy to help.  [email protected]

Dayton lighting company offers the President a lamp for Presidents Day

For Immediate Release

Microsun Lamps ad in Washington Post Feb 16, 2018

Microsun offered the President a free lamp for Presidents Day. Click to download full size PDF

 

Dayton Ohio: In a half page ad in the Washington Post today, Microsun Lamps of Dayton offered to provide the Oval office with one of their powerful reading lights. The headline “Maybe our President would read more if he wasn’t in the dark” was a provocative entendre to open a discussion about the President’s known aversion to reading, and Microsun’s assertion that most older Americans are reading with too little light. President Trump, at 71, would likely find the true full spectrum light, that’s optimized for older eyes helpful when reading overly long documents like the federal budget.

If the President takes them up on their offer, this wouldn’t be the first Microsun lamp in the halls of government, their most popular lamp is called the “Library of Congress” and the lamps are actually in use there.

The output of a single Microsun lamp is the equivalent of eight 60-watt bulbs, yet only uses about 90 watts of electricity. Each lamp contains three bulbs: two LED full spectrum lamps on one switch, and the proprietary Microsun bulb in the center on a second switch. It’s the center bulb that makes it “The light that rises”, taking a few minutes to “rise” to full brightness.

The combination of the three bulbs provides more light in the wavelengths that most bulbs do not, and that are crucial for eyes of people over 50 who need more blue light to counter the yellowing of eyes with age. Most seniors find they can put away magnifying glasses and “readers” when using a Microsun lamp, and can read longer without eyestrain.

The company, which is celebrating its twentieth year in 2018, assembles and ships lights from their new 30,000 sq ft headquarters in Dayton where they have a factory showroom. Most of their sales are direct, from their website at www.microsun.com or via phone. All lamps come with a 30-day money-back guarantee, allowing their customers to try them at home without risk. Returns are a rarity. The company recently surpassed 100,000 units sold.

So far, no word on if President Trump will accept their gift. In the meantime, Microsun will continue on their quest to “Make America Bright Again” in 2018.

Lighting considerations for assisted living

Lighting considerations for assisted living

As more older Americans are looking to assisted living at their homes rather than residential care, it has become even more important to understand the lighting needs of the aging eye.

According to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, almost 79 percent of individuals who require long-term care live in communities or their own homes rather than institutions. Many have been living in the same place a long time, and they are not willing to give up the years of memories living in their house. Independence is a goal that many aging Americans want to attain, both in regard to their living situation and the tasks they take on throughout their day.

While at-home care options can help these older individuals remain independent, assisted living does not provide round-the-clock care. Typically, these Americans are spending more time without home health care aides.

The National Institute on Aging reported that housing updates are one of the main considerations for aging individuals who want to stay in their homes and receive at-home care rather than moving into a residential care facility. Many of these individuals are willing to make renovations to their homes to accommodate their changing needs, including the installation of grab bars in the tub or shower, nonskid floors and lower light switches.

Where lighting enters the picture
In addition to thinking about new hardware installations, aging Americans have to consider whether the table or floor reading lamps in their home can provide enough light for their tasks. Whether it be reading, cooking or walking to the bathroom in the darker hours of the day, having adequate light is a necessity, especially given that aging eyes require brighter, low-glare illumination.

The quality of light in a home can have implications that exceed the ability to read a novel in the evening. Falls are a serious problem for aging adults, as they can lead to more serious injuries. Poor lighting can be a contributing factor to falls if left unaddressed.

Why lighting considerations are important
While living in a residential care facility does not necessary guarantee more comfortable long-term care, it can provide additional amenities compared to residing in a community or receiving at-home care. For this reason, it is necessary that a home is made suitable for such accommodations.

Residential care facilities are built around the needs of aging individuals, whereas a normal home is less likely to be constructed with similar challenges in mind. Getting a house up to par with those facilities’ measures – from big changes like a wheelchair ramp to small changes like buying better reading lamps – is a necessity.

Tips for optimizing your home for at-home care
With a few changes around your house, you can update your lighting scheme to fit your visual needs and make it a safe environment. Here are a few low-impact ways that you can upgrade to adequate illumination in your home:

  • Invest in shaded lamps. If you use floor or table reading lamps, consider purchasing new ones that are shaded to lower your exposure to glare. In addition to protecting your eyes, lamps can add to your home’s decor. Microsun offers a number of high-quality lamps in a variety of finishes to match the style of your house.
  • Consider dimming controls as well so that you can adjust the brightness in certain rooms to appropriate levels for the task at hand.
  • Add more light to rooms where you often complete tasks such as reading and cooking.

Keep in mind that these are not solely considerations for when you are faced with the immediate need for long-term care. Once you start to notice your vision changing as a result of aging, you should start to tailor your home lighting to your new visual demands.